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I honestly wish everyone could have a job they love that doesn’t lead them to the dreaded job burnout. Even in a position you once loved, burnout is a possibility.

It’s not uncommon to hear people talking about being overwhelmed or needing things to slow down a little. However, too much work isn’t the only cause.

I’ve heard plenty of people talk about going through this experience and it’s terrible. The stress can hurt you both physically and emotionally and lead to troubles at work and in your personal life. This is why it’s important to learn how to avoid it.

Know the Signs

First and foremost, is it job burnout or just a bad week? While some experts believe having depression or anxiety may make you more likely to experience burnout, it can happen to anyone. The easiest way to avoid it is by knowing the symptoms and taking action quickly. Some of the top symptoms include:

  • Trouble sleeping
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Suddenly critical and/or cynical at work
  • Absolutely dread or hate even going to work
  • Issues with sudden headaches, stomach issues and even muscle aches
  • Low energy levels
  • No patience with customers and co-workers
  • Making yourself feel better by turning to vices, such as alcohol and drugs

Before you rush to the assumption that it’s definitely your job that’s the problem, I want you to make sure there aren’t any other reasons for you to feel this way. For instance, a death of a close family member, a major breakup, issues adjusting to a new city or a serious medical diagnosis can all cause similar symptoms. However, if it does all tie back to your job, it’s time to take action.

Identify the Issue

Even if you’re not experiencing any serious symptoms, your current workplace conditions may have you on the brink. Start by identifying why you’re feeling less than enthused about your job. According to Forbes, there are typically six main causes of a professional job burnout:

  • No control over your situation
  • Not feeling rewarded (praise, money, pride in your work)
  • Feeling alone (no real teamwork or socialization)
  • Feeling as if things aren’t fair
  • Not meshing with a workplace’s or co-worker’s values
  • Feeling overloaded or overwhelmed

Inc. also suggests the following as additional causes:

  • Too much repetition
  • High stress environment
  • Little to no chance of promotion
  • Bland or even toxic environment

Avoiding Job Burnout

Once you have an idea of what’s causing you to dread even the thought of your current job, it’s time to avoid job burnout. In many cases, simply bringing up the issue with your supervisor or even HR personnel is enough to change your situation. This is especially true in cases of fairness, being overloaded and not having control.

If you just don’t like working in the exact same office or cubicle every single day, change it up. Decorate a little or even request to move to a different office or area. Sometimes a change in scenery really helps.

Handling Burnout Symptoms Early

Another way to avoid job burnout is to start addressing the symptoms as soon as you notice them. I can honestly say I would’ve likely dealt with burnout myself if I didn’t focus on taking care of myself. Putting yourself first helps you to push through your situation easier and skip burnout altogether. Some great ideas to try include:

  • Use your vacation days. Don’t let work run your entire life.
  • Set aside free time each day just for yourself. Even if it’s just 10 minutes, having something to look forward to and de-stress helps.
  • Practice meditation and exercise.  Endorphins help everything!
  • Talk to a friend, relative or professional if symptoms seem to be getting worse.
  • Focus on getting better sleep.
  • Start a hobby to help you stop thinking about work.

If you are experiencing burn out or think you are on the brink, contact your HR department and let them know.  We value our team at A+ Staffing and always want the opportunity to provide a great work/life integration for our teams.